Sherpas are the real heroes

Please remember that, as we prepare to start reading stories in the mainstream media about the annual Mount Everest climbing season.

See this video below to understand why none of this sillyness would be possible without them:

It’s just a casual chat between two guys; about a rescue one participated in high on Everest. Interspersed with some AMAZING GoPro footage from Mount Everest. Gives you a true sense of the Himalaya.

But more important than the mountains, are the people. I think you will get that sense, after listening to these guys chat.

Love always to the Nepali people. Namaste.

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What’s it like to climb Mount Everest?

It’s April, which means for climbers (and the world’s ultra-wealthy), it’s Everest season!

Throughout April and May, while the hordes descend (or rather ascend) on Everest, there are bound to be an endless number of news stories about successful summits, tragedies, and plenty of puff pieces about the logistics of the whole thing.

Want to learn a bit more authentically about what goes on up there?

You should watch this Joe Rogan podcast with Jeff Evans and Bud Brutsman, two guys who discuss their experiences climbing Mount Everest and managing rescue operations on the mountain in super-fascinating levels of detail. It’s two hours long, but compelling all the way through.

Check it out beyond the jump.

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Book Review: To Touch the Top of the World by Erik Weihenmayer

My sister gave me “To Touch the Top of the World” as a gift, maybe ten, twelve years ago. “It’s about a blind guy that climbed Mount Everest,” she said. “Super inspiring.”

Cool, I replied, probably with a roll of my eyes, and set it aside. The book sat in my bookcase for the next decade, patiently waiting.

I picked it up the other day, in a moment of boredom, and found myself tearing through it. It is, as my sister said all those years ago, super inspiring.

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Nepal 11: Fixations

Mount Everest Base Camp Trek

As I entered the lobby of the Annapurna Guesthouse, the owner greeted me warmly. He asked about my travel and how I liked my room.

“Load shedding right now,” he said, pointing at the lights. “No power.”

I nodded, dumbly. That explained the cold shower and nonfunctional TV.

“We have generator though,” he said. “No interruption.”

I could have asked him why the power was down if his generator ensured no interruption, but I really didn’t care. A few months ago, when I was working midnight shifts for my company back in the U.S., reliable power and wifi would have been my paramount priority. Now, I had a different job, one I could work on any schedule I chose. But to be honest, I didn’t much feel like working at all in Nepal.

Why should I care if the power went out, now and then?

Isn’t that why I was here, halfway across the world: to disconnect, to see something new?

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