Sherpas are the real heroes

Please remember that, as we prepare to start reading stories in the mainstream media about the annual Mount Everest climbing season.

See this video below to understand why none of this sillyness would be possible without them:

It’s just a casual chat between two guys; about a rescue one participated in high on Everest. Interspersed with some AMAZING GoPro footage from Mount Everest. Gives you a true sense of the Himalaya.

But more important than the mountains, are the people. I think you will get that sense, after listening to these guys chat.

Love always to the Nepali people. Namaste.

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Funny Thailand Signs

One of the great charms of traveling in Asia is the charming broken English.

English signs, menus shirts, slogans, etc. are pretty common. English isn’t everywhere, but there’s been an effort made. The strange thing though, is that these English translations are littered with misspellings and poor grammar. They’re generally intelligible, though, with a little work.

Part of the fun and charm of traveling in Asia!

Below, I’ve compiled a gallery of some examples of bad English in Thailand, gathered from a recent thread on Twitter.

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Europe’s Last Free Rivers

I’ve been spending a lot of time in Europe recently; from big cities to the mountain ranges to tiny little villages in the middle of nowhere.

As an American, one of the most striking things I noticed in Europe was the importance of water. Rivers are the lifeblood of this continent. The major cities were built around them, which makes sense, as back in the day waterways were by far the quickest and most efficient method of moving people and goods around.

The European conquest of nature extends far beyond building cities though; almost every single major river on the continent has been dammed for hydroelectric power.

As an American, and one from the West, this fusion of civilization and nature always struck me in an odd way. In the U.S., we usually separate these things. Our nation was built on the back of railroad and automobile infrastructure, which means besides the Mississippi and a few other routes, rivers have largely been left alone. We prefer coal and oil over hydropower (not necessarily a good thing). We also enjoy a deep bond with our public lands.

In the US, our wilderness is untamed and unaltered as much as we can make it so.

For me, this respect for the land and the ecosystems is just as American as the right to own guns, or eat cheeseburgers, or whatever else foreigners associate with our nation. The first time I saw trees painted to mark trails in Hungary, I was horrified. The golden words in the American wilderness are Leave No Trace.

So when I read this article on Adventure Journal about the planned damming of Europe’s last, pristine rivers in the Balkan Peninsula, my initial reaction was pretty negative.

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Armchair Travel: Chernobyl Exclusion Zone

Armchair Traveler is my series about places I have no personal experience with. Usually, it’s just a piece of content someone else produced that I find fascinating and think my audience would also enjoy!

If you spend a lot of time on the Internet, you probably recognize Drew Scanlon as this guy with the weird blinks:

For about a month in 2017, this GIF was a super popular meme. Almost unavoidable on social media. Which was weird for me, since I recognized Drew from Giant Bomb, a video game site where I used to be a frequent contributor. We used to chat in the IRC.

But times change, and Drew doesn’t work there, and I don’t think about video games much anymore (read an essay about that, here).

When he’s not moonlighting as an Internet meme, Drew produces a series of travel videos, called Cloth Map. He recently visited the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone in Ukraine, and documented the strange experience of visiting a place most of us have only ever seen in computer games.

See the 30-minute video below:

You can support Cloth Map on Patreon.

A Completely Arbitrary List of My 20 Favorite Cities in the World

List of 20 Best Cities To Travel in the World

Every travel magazine, site, and company worth their salt has a “x best cities list.” While yes, some cities do generally feel a little better than others, the truth  is… it’s all subjective. The city that steals one person’s heart may leave another with a stolen wallet, and the pair will return home with two very different tales to tell their friends of foreign hospitality.

So, with that in mind, here’s my ranked list of my 20 favorite cities in the world.

And as they say: I haven’t been everywhere, but it’s on my list. Feel free to give me suggestions for cities you think I’d like in the comments!

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